COVID-19: Alberta reports 369 new cases Friday as hospitalizations, active cases continue to climb

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Hospitalizations due to COVID-19 continue to increase as active cases hit 2,719 update Friday.

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It follows a trend of rising active cases that began on July 14, when there were 566. It’s the highest number of active cases in the province since June 14, when there were 2,807.

The new case numbers come after chief medical officer of health Dr. Deena Hinshaw said Thursday evening internal modelling suggests the spread of COVID-19 in Alberta are expected to peak in early September.

On Friday, Alberta reported 369 new COVID-19 cases, 28 fewer than were reported Thursday, but active cases increased by 193.

While Hinshaw and public health experts have noted that hospitalizations and severe outcomes are a key metric as more of the population gets protection from vaccines, there are now 11 more Albertans in hospital due to COVID-19 than the previous day’s update, at 113, including 25 in intensive care units.

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That’s after the number of hospitalizations declined to as low as 82 as of last Tuesday’s update, but has seen several incremental daily increases beginning last Wednesday, when there were 84.

With more than 5.36 million doses administered in the province, rates for those eligible who have received their first shot remained flat Friday, at 76.2 per cent, while the rate of those who have received both doses climbed by a fraction of a per cent to 66.4 per cent.

The province’s death toll due to COVID-19 dropped to 2,325 from 2,329, as four deaths were removed from the count.

The vast majority of active cases continue to be in the Calgary zone, where there are 1,414. The Edmonton zone has 527 active cases.

The province’s seven-day average for test positivity is 3.99 per cent. There are 1,956 active variant cases in Alberta, with 133 new variant cases identified as of the latest update.

lijohnson@postmedia.com

twitter.com/reportrix

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